Saturday, June 28, 2008

Rudd takes the easy option on petrol

It seems to be a pattern

This is what Phil Coorey reports in today's Sydney Morning Herald:

"MOTORISTS will be spared an increase in the price of fuel under the emissions trading scheme being thrashed out by the Federal Government.As a special climate change subcommittee of cabinet met again yesterday, followed by a full cabinet meeting, senior Government sources told the Herald that the starting point was that there be no net increase in the price of petrol.

"We are not going to do people over," one senior minister said.

The Government's price commitment indicates that should fuel be included in the emissions scheme, petrol excise would be cut to offset the increase caused by the imposition of a carbon tax.

Another option is to defer the inclusion of petrol until after the election scheduled for late 2010."


With people like Rudd in charge...

Also today, in the Telegraph Laurie Oakes sums up the decision-making dynamics.

Here's why I think petrol should be included in the scheme. It has to do with low-hanging fruit.

An awful lot will unfold over the next few days.

Professor Ross Garnaut will release his draft report this Friday July 4, 2008 at the National Press Club. ABC TV will broadcast it live from 12.30pm.

On the day before, Thursday July 3, at the ANU climate change modeller Warwick McKibben outlines his (very different) ideas.

Then a fortnight later on Wednesday July 16, the Climate Change Minister Penny Wong unveils the government's emissions trading Green Paper at the National Press Club. ABC TV will also broadcast this live from 12.30pm.

And living in Canberra, Australia's best city, I get to go to all three on your behalf. Lucky, aren't I?

1 comments:

mOOm said...

The current taxes on petrol (50 cents per litre) amount to a $300-400 dollar or so a tonne carbon tax. So cutting the excise a bit when the carbon trading or tax comes in so the price of petrol isn't immediately increased won't be too hard. It'd be good politics with minimal economic or environmental cost.

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